Connected Living Part 4: Privacy matters

 Editorial credit:  / Shutterstock.com

Editorial credit:  / Shutterstock.com

IN THIS BLOG SERIES WE LOOK AT THE RESULTS OF RESEARCH ASK4 COMMISSIONED EARLIER IN 2017 TO EXPLORE THE CONNECTED LIVING HABITS OF 14-16 YEAR OLD EUROPEAN TEENS.

We will be sharing the five standout characteristics of the group who will be moving into the student accommodation buildings and build-to-rent developments already in planning for 2020.

Part 4: Privacy matters - and 14–16 year olds will take steps to protect it.

You might think that growing up in a world built around digital communication would mean European teens are more likely to adopt a complacent approach to online privacy. You would be wrong. Familiarity, it seems, breeds concern. European teens are both privacy aware and privacy savvy.

Two thirds said they worry about their privacy when using devices connected to the Internet. More than half think they can be tracked too easily when using their devices and that there will be too much information about them online as they get older.

Almost all teens have taken steps to protect their online privacy, including blocking friend requests, changing privacy settings, regularly changing passwords and avoiding sharing personal information. In fact, only 8% of teens said that they have taken no active steps to protect their personal information and identities online.

WHO AM I?

Alongside ramping up privacy precautions, European teens are also highly likely to have multiple online identities. That means using different names, contact details and images for different profiles and accounts. Over half admitted to having 2 or more online identities and a quarter said they had 3 or more.

The mains reasons given for multiple identities were being able to separate different parts of their personal lives (e.g. groups of friends) and being able to protect personal information from hackers. However, having more than one online identity also appears to give European teens a sense of autonomy. Over a third said it gave them more freedom, while a quarter said it gave them the confidence to say and do things they could not do in the ‘real world’.

Avoiding parental scrutiny was the least reported concern, with just 1 in 7 saying they used multiple identities to keep information from Mum and Dad.

LINKS

> Download and read the full Connected Living Report here.
> Find out more about ASK4's unique solution to connected living within multi-tenant buildings here.

All statistics are taken from ASK4’s Connected Living survey conducted by Red Brick Research in the Spring of 2017 (unless otherwise stated). The survey was completed by 3,067 14-16 year olds across all regions of the UK, Germany and Spain.

In+association+with+Red+Brick+Research.png
 
download+(2).png